The nation’s weather

Weather Underground midday recap for Saturday, March 30, 2013.

Severe weather moved through the center of the nation on Saturday, while a combination of rain and snow developed over the Great Lakes. An elongated low pressure system moved over the Plains and into the Mississippi River Valley. Moisture from the Gulf of Mexico was pulled northward ahead of this system, feeding energy into the Southern Plains and Southeast. In combination with a warm front over the region, this allowed for showers and thunderstorms to develop across the Central and Southern Plains. Throughout the day, these storms moved into the Lower and Mid-Mississippi River Valley. This system has a history of producing severe thunderstorms, but severe thunderstorms have not yet developed. The main threats remained as large hail, strong winds, and periods of heavy rainfall. Heaviest rainfall in these areas was reported at Tahlequah, Oklahoma with a mid-day total of 2.00 inches of rain. Cooler temperatures to the north allowed for freezing rain and snow showers to develop over the Upper Peninsula of Michigan and parts of far northern Minnesota and Wisconsin. To the west, the back side of this system allowed for widespread scattered rain and snow showers to persist for parts of the Northern and Central Rockies.

Further West, a low pressure system off the West Coast advanced eastward and pushed some moisture into California. This brought scattered rain showers to the state, which increased throughout the day.

Temperatures in the Lower 48 states Saturday have ranged from a morning low of 12 degrees at Minot, N.D. to a midday high of 82 degrees at Harlingen, Texas

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