Final Farewell Comes for Niles McKinley

Niles McKinley Final Farewell
Monday was the final farewell for the old Niles McKinley High School.

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On Tuesday, Niles McKinley High School students will be the first group of students to attend classes in the new building.

The old high school in Niles opened its doors in 1957. While thousands of students have crowded the halls through the years, many returned on Monday for one final look at the soon to be demolished building.

“It’s a building of the future. It’s looking more to where will our students go when looking for jobs when they graduate,” said Niles Superintendent Frank Danso.

Tuesday will be the first day for students in the new building. That was a day June Karovic remembers in the old building, in 1957.

“It was beautiful, it was wonderful. We were all excited and took it in our stride. Everyone was lost but it only took a few days,” she said.

Karovic met her husband at the school and has fond memories of playing piano for the choir.

The sophomore class sold t-shirts for a fundraiser and did pretty well.

“We had 100 t-shirts and we sold them in one hour,” said sophomore Hannah Frederick.

“Yeah, and there’s a lot of people ordering them too,” said sophomore Sarah Pack.

If a t-shirt isn’t enough, Basinger Auctions will be holding an online auction, beginning at 5 a.m. Tuesday.

Some  took photos, while others wrote  their names on the walls and reminisced with old classmates.

“Oh yeah. I ran into a lot already and I haven’t even gotten halfway down the hallway yet,” said Lisa Zarconi, class of 1999.

A flag raising ceremony will take place at the new $25 million facility at 9 a.m. Tuesday.

The new K-2 and 3-5 buildings are slated to open in the fall. The majority of funds for the new high school came from the Ohio School Facilities Commission, which paid 71 percent of the cost. The rest came from a bond issue passed by voters.

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