Former Sports Anchor Overcomes Cancer

Bill Castrovince
Bill Castrovince

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Just a few years ago, it was an afterthought for Bill Castrovince to spend five minutes a night using his words to guide viewers through a sportscast.

But on a fall day in 2011, his fiance, Carolyn, asked him a question, and Castrovince had every intention of using his words to answer.

“I could just look at her, and I was like ‘eh, eh, eh.’ I just couldn’t talk,” he said during a recent interview.

After a trip to the emergency room, Castrovince was admitted to University Hospital in Cleveland. He had a brain tumor. He underwent surgery and found out two weeks later that it was cancer.

“I had a glioblastoma; grade was four out of four. And then the doctor said, ‘A year from now 100 people that have this, 50 will be here and 50 won’t,’” Castrovince said.

The odds didn’t faze him.

But the same can’t be said for the battle that lie ahead: Six weeks of treatment, radiation five days a week, chemo seven days a week.

“My body wasn’t doing so good with the chemo pill and everything like that, so it was a photo finish to get it done. It was awful,” Castrovince said.

However, those awful feelings produced some positive results. Currently, Castrovince is cancer free. In fact, just about 10 months after having brain surgery, he and Carolyn married.

“I feel like I’ve been part of his family for 10 years. We kind of bypassed the getting to know each other and now we’re dealing with serious issues,” Carolyn said.

And for Castrovince, there are still many serious issues. The most immediate directly involves day-to-day interactions.

“The speech thing is still a problem. Wherever the tumor was, once it’s replaced, everything has to be reconnected. That’s where I’m still at,” Castrovince said.

He now works at Classic Teleproductions in Twinsburg, where Castrovince gets his fair share of practice producing stories and co-anchoring a weekly show.

But the biggest factor helping him improve is the support he’s been shown by his wife, his family, his personal friends and the ones he’s made through the television.

“You can’t get through it alone,” Castrovince said.

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