The nation’s weather

Weather Underground midday recap for Monday, May 27, 2013.

Unsettled weather continued in the nation¼’s mid-section this Memorial Day, while severe storms remained possible in the Plains. Showers and thunderstorms persisted from parts of the Northern High Plains through the Central Plains and into the Midwest as low pressure ejecting from the Rockies moved into the Northern and Central Plains and an associated warm front reached through the Ohio Valley. Showers coupled with local runoff and possible heavy rains will raise flood and flash flood concerns from parts of southeastern South Dakota through Iowa and into Illinois.

Meanwhile, increased instability over parts of the Northern High Plains through the Central Plains into the Mid-Mississippi Valley and southward across the Southern Plains led to a slight risk of severe thunderstorm development in these areas through the afternoon and evening. While very large hail events were the primary severe weather threat for these areas, isolated tornadoes were also possible. The severe weather risk in south-central/southeastern Nebraska and north-central /northeastern Kansas was elevated to a moderate risk.

Elsewhere, after a chilly weekend, temperatures in the Northeast began to warm back up Monday as the cold trough of low pressure over the region exited and high pressure returned to the region. Out West, a late season storm will reached the Northwest coast, bringing a cold air mass and more showers to the Pacific Northwest, the Northern Intermountain West, and parts of northern and central California. Steady rains, heavy rainfall totals, and windy weather conditions were anticipated in areas near the Pacific Northwest and northwestern California.

Temperatures in the Lower 48 states Monday have ranged from a morning low of 23 degrees at Mt. Washington, N.H. to a midday high of 100 degrees at Wink, Texas

blog comments powered by Disqus