Sheriff: Boys in Steubenville Rape Case Could Be Moved

Steubenville High School
FILE - In this file photo from Jan. 9, 2013, a security guard stands near the entrance to Steubenville High School in Steubenville, Ohio. Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine said on Thursday April 25, 2013 that search warrants have been executed at the high school attended by the two football players convicted in this trial. DeWine's office says in a statement that search warrants were also executed Thursday at the Steubenville school board offices and a northeast Ohio digital investigations company. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic, File)

The judge in the Steubenville rape case in which two teenage football players were convicted of brutally raping a 16-year-old girl will likely allow the boys to be transferred from the a state-run detention center to a private facility with lesser restrictions on inmates, according to the county sheriff.

Trent Mays and Ma’lik Richmond, who were convicted of raping the West Virginia girl in separate incidents after an alcohol-fueled party in August, will likely serve the rest of their juvenile prison sentence at New Life for Youth Paint Creek facility in Bainbridge.

Jefferson County Sheriff Fred Abdalla said in a news release on Wednesday the judge will likely approve the move at a June 14 hearing in Jefferson County Juvenile Court. The judge will also decide the boys’ sex offender classification at the hearing, a requirement before they can be moved to Paint Creek.

Tier 1 juvenile sex offenders are required to register every year for 10 years, Tier II offenders every six months for 20 years and Tier III offenders every 90 days for the rest of their life.

The boys had been held at facility run by the state Department of Youth Services since their March conviction, a more traditional juvenile prison facility with cells and jail security.

Adballa said in his release the Paint Creek facility has no bars or fences outside on their 33-acre property. Abdalla noted there is still “restraint of liberty and institutional living.”

“The living circumstances are more pleasant at Paint Creek especially as compared to dormitory institutions,” Abdalla said.

Abdalla said both boys behaved well at their current facility. The move requires a judge’s approval and a contract with the court to move any state inmates to the private facility.

A spokeswoman with DYS said they have not asked for the boy to be transferred and that all their facilities “are able to meet the unique needs of youth.”

There is little flight risk at Paint Creek. Abdalla said facility treats sex offenders better than other state-run facilities. The boys could eventually stay in the facility longer than if they stayed in a DYS facility because treatment must be completed before they’re released, Abdalla said.

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