‘Super’ Moon set for Saturday

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It won’t be a bird or a plane, but the brightest object in the sky Saturday night will be the “super” moon.

It’s the biggest and brightest of full moons. The moon will pass about 15,000 miles closer to Earth than average. That will make it appear about 12 percent bigger than usual.

Like any full moon, it will look bigger when it’s hanging close to the horizon, which happens around sunset in the southeastern sky.

“Like in all sorts of things, in my opinion in astronomy it’s cool to look at,” said YSU Planetarium Director Pat Durrell. “Even if it’s only slightly larger to look at. It’s a good time to go look at it. And it’ll be in the sky all night, the full moon, because it’s opposite, it’s on the other side of the Earth as the sun, it’s the one phase of the moon that’s up all night but you never see it during the day.”

A supermoon happens when the full phase of the moon occurs during Perigee, which is when the moon is closest to the Earth.  The supermoon seen June 22-23, 2013 is the closest supermoon of the year.

 

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