Agents raid business

allied pain raid

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Law enforcement agencies in Boardman, New Castle and Columbus on Tuesday raided a pain treatment business whose owner had his medical license placed on probation in three states because of his drug abuse.

Federal, state and local agents began raiding at about 10 a.m. the Allied Pain Treatment Center at 950 Windham Ct. Officials said similar federal search warrants were being executed at Allied Pain offices in New Castle and Columbus for alleged criminal activity.

Youngstown BCI agent Jim Ciotti said no one would be arrested on Tuesday in connection with the raids.

Medical board disciplinary records from Ohio, Pennsylvania and New York obtained by WKBN.COM say Allied Pain Treatment owner Thomas A. Ranieri was addicted to anti-anxiety medication, painkillers, steroids and alcohol from 1997 through 2000.

Records say he prescribed the drugs to himself and in his wife’s name and treated patients while under their influence.

Pennsylvania’s medical board placed him on probation for at least three years and New York placed him on two years probation. Ohio’s board suspended his license for eight months and placed him on probation for an additional five years, records say.

On Tuesday, the Drug Enforcement Agency, Bureau of Worker’s Compensation, Ohio Bureau of Criminal Identification and Investigation, Boardman police, U.S. Inspector General’s Office, Ohio Pharmacy Board, Ohio Medical Board and the Ohio Attorney General’s Office all raided the Boardman office, seizing boxes of evidence related to a nearly one-year long investigation.

The search warrants are sealed and not open to the public. Officials said because of the seals, they were unable to provide details about the alleged activity. Ciotti said the raids were about more than just drugs.

Records from the Ohio State Medical Board say Ranieri admitted to his addiction and received three weeks of inpatient treatment, another three-week treatment at a halfway house in Boca Raton, Fla., and enrolled in the Pennsylvania Physician’s Health Program and Committee for Physician’s Health, which included regular drug testing until at least 2005, records say.

A Newark, Ohio doctor provided written reports to the Ohio Medical Board saying Ranieri was capable of practicing medicine and surgery as long as he was treated and monitored properly.

Records say Ranieri admitted to injecting himself with anabolic steroids in 1996 to increase muscle mass for a fitness competition. In 1997, he became addicted to Xanax and was taking as much as three pills per day by 1999.

He started injecting testosterone in 1998 and continued through 2000. Ranieri also told the board he started prescribing Valium, an anti-anxiety drug, in his wife’s name for his own use in 1999 and took one 10-milligram pill every night.

Ranieri also told the board he prescribed for himself Vicodin and hydrocodone in his wife’s name in 1999 and eventually took eight pills per day by 2000.  Throughout his drug abuse, he told the health board he drank one or two alcoholic cocktails every night to increase their effects.

Pennsylvania Board of Medicine records say Ranieri’s addiction caused him “employment problems, marital problems, alienation of friends and family, expense and inconvenience of treatment.”

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