Rocky Ridge walking tour set Saturday

Mill Creek maple syrup

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The Rocky Ridge neighborhood on Youngstown’s West Side will be the site of a walking tour on Saturday afternoon.

The walking tour is the first of a series of free “History to Go” lecture programs being presented by the Mahoning Valley Historical Society’s Young Leaders Advisory Board. It is being presented by the Mill Creek MetroParks and Rocky Ridge Neighborhood Association, which was founded three years ago.

The Rocky Ridge neighborhood is bordered by McCollum Road, Belle Vista Avenue, Mahoning Avenue and Schenley Avenue. The neighborhood tour will focus on the history of the neighborhood and include information regarding its present and future plans.

Tour guides will be Bill Lawson, executive director of the Mahoning Valley Historical Society, and John Slanina, president of the Rocky Ridge Neighborhood Association. Participants will meet in the parking lot of the Shrine of Our Lady Comforter of the Afflicted, 517 N. Belle Vista Ave., at 1 p.m.

The first half of the event will be a short walking tour along Belle Vista focused on the history of Rocky Ridge and the neighborhood’s current efforts to revitalize the area. The second half will be a short walking tour of the James L. Wick Recreation Area, covering the history of this part of the park with MetroParks staff discussing their renovation plans.

Guests will be given time to either walk or move their cars from one site to the other. Guests will be treated to a tasting of the Mill Creek maple syrup that was produced and sold this past spring. A bottle of the syrup also will be given away as a door prize.

The event ends at 3 p.m. and is free and open to the public. For more information, visit the Mahoning Valley Historical Society’s website.

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