Violence escalates in Egypt

Mideast Egypt

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Growing violence between those loyal to ousted Egyptian president Mohammed Morsi and the country’s Army has now claimed more than 600 lives with most of the killing happening in the last 24 hours.

The nephew of a local physicianlocal physician is a reporter in the war-torn county. Basil El-Dahb works for the English language newspaper Daily News Egypt. He said by phone on Thursday from Cairo locals there fear the violence will resume after a brief stay during Friday services. At the time of the call, local time in Egypt was midnight Friday.

El-Dahb said violence between the opposing sides in Egypt is not new, but what’s happened this week has not been seen before.

“Just in terms of number of deaths, level of violence on the streets,” said El Dahb

El-Dahb said there are a few “good guys” leading the fighting on both sides.

“I think the point we’re at now is a result of mistakes made by both the Army and Muslim Brotherhood, in addition to other groups.”

President Obama said the United States wants to support what he calls a “peaceful, democratic and prosperous Egypt.”

“The United States strongly condemns the steps that have been taken by Egypt’s interim government security forces,” Obama said.

“I don’t know where the State Department, where President Obama is getting his information from, but it breaks my heart to listen to it,” said El-Dahb.

Dr. Rashad El-Dahb is a radiation-oncologist with Humility of Mary Health Partners. He grew up in Egypt but has lived in Northeast Ohio the last 30 years. He is also Basil El-Dahb’s uncle. Dr. El-Dahb said those leading the protests are terrorists and that the majority of Egyptians support the country’s Army, not ousted President Mohammad Morsi.

“We should support the Egyptian people themselves. We should encourage them to proceed into democracy, to self-govern themselves and get out of the terrorists from Egypt,” said Dr. El-Dahb.

Dr. El-Dahb said a lot of events in Egypt are not being reported in the U.S. saying 52 churches were burned to the ground over the last couple of days by those loyal to Morsi and the Muslim Brotherhood.



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