Ohio sales tax rises

OH_TAX

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Sunday’s shoppers in Ohio might have noticed they paid a bit more at the register.

It is part of a new sales tax increase, among other tax increases, that went into affect on Sunday.

“I was at Shoe Carnival and Kohls and I did not notice a difference, I did not even know it went up,” said shopper Melanie Rowley.

“Nobody likes to pay extra money but the cost of everything keeps going up and up and up so you have to get revenue somehow. Do I want to pay extra sales tax? No. But do I understand why they do it, yes,” added shopper Charles Davis.

The hike is a quarter of a percent from 5.5 to 5.75, depending on where you shop will depend on what you pay. With the increases, Columbiana County’s sales tax is now 7.25 percent, Mahoning County is seven percent and Trumbull County is 6.75. The increase is a part of the new two-year, $62 billion state budget; something local leaders don’t agree with.

“That is really our money, we are the residents here all throughout the state. So I would like him to hold public hearings on what he is going to do with the increase in sales tax,” said Mahoning County Commissioner Carol Rimedio-Righetti.

The sales tax increase is not the only tax change that begins Sunday. An income tax decrease will have Ohio workers seeing a slight increase in their paychecks, which won’t only benefit employees, but employers as well.

“Basically what it is, you will see a bigger paycheck because the tax is being withheld from your check to be sent into the state of Ohio is going to be less,” said Ohio Tax Commissioner Joe Testa.

“When they know they get a 50 percent tax cut on the 250,000, it gives them space to do more things. Hire more people, buy more equipment,” commented Ohio Governor John Kasich.

It is a part of a steady increase of what workers will see in their paychecks over the next few years. Employers will withhold 8.5 percent less this year, nine next year, and ten in 2015. The sales tax increase is the first the state has seen since 2003.

 

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