Sebring water in the clear

SEBRING, Ohio (WKBN) – A major water treatment plant addition is about to come online just outside Sebring.

In the last few years, contaminants such as trihalomethanes and haloacetic acids have exceeded EPA limits for drinking water in the village.

The contaminants are created when materials such as leaves, grass and twigs mix with chlorine that is used to disinfect surface water.

Sebring water customers have gotten notices on their doors for years about the problem.

“We knew we were in violation. We knew, so we had to hand them out,” said Sebring Water Superintendent Jim Bates. “Now we are getting to the point where we are going to be good to go and put out good water.”

Last May, construction started on a nearly $2 million addition to the treatment plant. One part of the process includes giant carbon canisters that will filter the disinfectant byproducts out of the water.

“It will be much cleaner. It will meet EPA standards and will get us out of violation,” said Bates.

Workers were at the facility Wednesday conducting a “wet run” where the pumps were turned on for the first time.

“Giving these the initial startup to make sure everything is in the parameters that they are supposed to be in before we start the actual permanent flow through the carbon filters,” said Project Superintendent Todd Mahoney.

The project was paid for through a block grant and a $1 million no-interest loan to the village.

The entire system is scheduled to go online April 1.

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