Trumbull Co. to ramp up water testing

Crews are cleaning a mineral oil leak at Mosquito Creek Reservoir in Bazetta.
Crews are cleaning a mineral oil leak at Mosquito Creek Reservoir in Bazetta.

TRUMBULL CO., Ohio (WKBN) — Trumbull Co. Soil & Water Conservation District Water Quality Specialist Eric Zamary has been working to get upgraded water testing ever since he interviewed for his job back in December.

His push helped get him hired. Soon, it may help officials keep better tabs on water quality in Trumbull County.

Starting this summer, the Trumbull County Soil and Water Conservation District will be using upgraded equipment to test streams in sixteen urban areas in Trumbull County with greater accuracy.

“It’s something we need to do, but we’ve been slacking on in the past few years,” Zamary said.

Zamary said the district’s water-testing in recent years has met federal standards, but with more basic testing equipment. He added that with concerns over what fracking may be doing to water quality, he thought it was time to ramp up their testing to levels seen five to ten years ago.

March 21, Zamary’s superiors decided that his request for a colorimeter, a device which allows testing for Environmental Protection Agency-approved measures for water pollution, was within their budget. He has been applying for the upgraded testing for about six months and says it will allow his department to monitor water composition trends.

Trumbull Co. Soil & Water Conservation District Watershed Coordinator Amy Reeher said most of the office’s funding comes from county and state funding but is supplemented by grants and partnerships.

Any water that test unusually high for pollutants will be sent to the District Board of Health Mahoning County Division of Laboratory Services for testing. Zamary said that for $60, the lab will also test water for farmers, to make sure they meet government pollution standards in five categories.

Reeher confirmed that the new equipment, plus the hiring of Zamary, will help their office gather better data.

“We’re definitely going to be able to do greater amounts of monitoring,” Reeher said of the upgrade

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