Engineer not amused by pothole planters

BEAVER TOWNSHIP, Ohio (WKBN) – Besides the snow that never seemed to end, potholes seem to be the next most miserable part of our long winter.

The Mahoning County engineer’s office is exhausting its overtime budget trying to fix the problem. But some neighbors say their road is so bad, they need something more. And they’re using a very unusual method to demonstrate it

If a picture is worth a thousand words, then Patti Wetzl just wrote a novel.

“If you could put flowers in the holes that they have repaired it clearly shows that the cold patch is not working and our road needs repaved,” said Wetzl.

Wetzl was frustrated with the potholes on Bassinger Road in Beaver Township. So, she decided to plant some flowers. Call it an illustration of sorts. She took the picture for a laugh but also wanted to bring attention to the condition of the road.

Mahoning County Engineer Pat Ginnetti was not amused.

“I don’t take that very lightly. I take that very seriously. Our guys get insulted by that. That is almost mocking the county,” said Ginnetti. “We are working very hard and doing everything we can.”

Ginnetti said his crews are out around the clock. The county has already spent three quarters of its annual overtime budget trying to fix the damage done by our long, hard winter.

“The road in the end will be a little bumpy, but the holes will be patched,” said Ginnetti.

Most of the potholes along the road have been patched. But residents say it is in such bad condition that patching isn’t enough. They want to see the road repaved. Ginnetti said there are many roads in the county that are in rough condition now, but with 500 miles of roadway to cover, it is just too expensive.

“The pothole repair is a temporary fix. In order to fully repair the road, you are looking at $1 million a mile,” said Ginnetti. “We would need $500 million to repair all of our roads.”

The Mahoning County Engineer’s Office is trying to secure as much funding as possible for paving projects, but Ginnetti said it is a long process and it may take a long time.

For Wetzl, there is no other option.

“This is a small road, under two miles. I am hoping that if in the event there is money for a road, it will be this road,” said Wetzl.

In the meantime, everyone will be driving a little slower.

Potholes testing patience of residents

blog comments powered by Disqus