Remains of Warren soldier identified after 64 years

WARREN, Ohio (WKBN) — A soldier from Warren who went missing in action during the Korean War nearly 64 years ago will be buried May 29 in Arlington National Cemetery in Washington, D.C.

The U.S. Department of Defense said the remains of Army Private 1st Class James Holmes, 18, have been identified and will be returned to his family.

In November 1950, Holmes was a member of Company K, 3rd Battalion, 24th Infantry Regiment, which was pushing north through North Korea to the Yalu River. In late November, the unit was attacked by enemy forces and withdrew south to the town of Anju. On Dec. 1, Holmes was declared missing in action, according to a news release from the U.S. Secretary of Defense’s Office.

As part of a 1953 prisoner exchange known as Operation Big Switch, returning U.S. service members reported that Holmes had been captured by the Chinese during that battle and died in 1951, in a prisoner of war camp known as Camp 5, near Pyoktong, North Korea.

Between 1991 and 1994, North Korea gave the United States 208 boxes of human remains believed to contain 350 to 400 U.S. servicemen who fought during the war. North Korean documents turned over with some of the boxes indicated that some of the remains were recovered from Pyoktong County, near the area where Holmes was believed to have died, the release stated.

To identify Holmes’ remains, scientists from the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command (JPAC) and the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory (AFDIL) used circumstantial evidence and forensic identification tools, including mitochondrial DNA, which matched his sister and brother.

Today, 7,883 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using modern technology, identifications continue to be made from remains that were previously turned over by North Korean officials or recovered from North Korea by American teams, the release stated.

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