NTSB still determining if engineer used phone before Amtrak crash

Amtrak assistant conductor, Brandon Bostian stands by as Sandra Palmer, center, says goodbye to her boyfriend, Clyde Simpson, before he boards the train at the Amtrak station in St. Louis. Federal investigators have determined that an Amtrak train that crashed in Philadelphia on Tuesday, May 12, 2015, killing at least seven people, was careening through the city at 106 mph before it ran off the rails along a sharp curve. The attorney for Bostian, the engineer at the controls of the train, said Thursday, his client has no recollection of the accident. (Huy Richard Mach/St. Louis Post-Dispatch via AP)
Amtrak assistant conductor, Brandon Bostian stands by as Sandra Palmer, center, says goodbye to her boyfriend, Clyde Simpson, before he boards the train at the Amtrak station in St. Louis. Federal investigators have determined that an Amtrak train that crashed in Philadelphia on Tuesday, May 12, 2015, killing at least seven people, was careening through the city at 106 mph before it ran off the rails along a sharp curve. The attorney for Bostian, the engineer at the controls of the train, said Thursday, his client has no recollection of the accident. (Huy Richard Mach/St. Louis Post-Dispatch via AP)

PHILADELPHIA (AP and CNN) – The National Transportation Safety Board issued a preliminary report on Tuesday regarding the Amtrak crash in Philadelphia.

According to the report, the train had no equipment problems prior to the accident.

Federal investigators are trying to determine if train engineer Brandon Bostian was using his cell phone at the time of the crash.

Bostian has been cooperative, but still doesn’t remember the moments leading up to the crash. He could face criminal charges if law enforcement finds that he was reckless or negligent.

The NTSB says the train entered a 50 mile-per-hour curve at 106 miles per hour. The report states that Bostian braked just seconds before the wreck.

The report estimates the damage from the May 12 crash to be greater than $9.2 million.

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