Game makers reflect on death of Nintendo’s Iwata at age 55

Shoppers move on an escalator under Nintendo's Super Mario characters at an electronics store in Tokyo, Monday, July 13, 2015. Satoru Iwata, who led Japanese video game company Nintendo Co. through years of growth with its Pokemon and Super Mario franchises, died on the weekend of a bile duct tumor, the company said Monday. He was 55. (AP Photo/Koji Sasahara)
Shoppers move on an escalator under Nintendo's Super Mario characters at an electronics store in Tokyo, Monday, July 13, 2015. Satoru Iwata, who led Japanese video game company Nintendo Co. through years of growth with its Pokemon and Super Mario franchises, died on the weekend of a bile duct tumor, the company said Monday. He was 55. (AP Photo/Koji Sasahara)

Video game creators and colleagues of Nintendo President Satoru Iwata shared their reactions to his death from a bile duct tumor at age 55:

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“Iwata-san’s passing affects us all deeply. He was a true visionary who expanded our understanding of the amazing art of video games. We offer our condolences to his family, friends and Nintendo colleagues.”

– Michael Gallagher, president and CEO of the Entertainment Software Association, in a statement

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“We are deeply saddened by the news of Mr. Iwata’s passing. He contributed greatly to gaming through his leadership, vision and commitment to delivering fun for everyone. On behalf of PlayStation, we’d like to extend our deepest condolences to Mr. Iwata’s family, friends and everyone at Nintendo. We shall miss his passing for as long as there is gaming.”

– Shawn Layden, president and CEO of Sony Computer Entertainment America, in a statement

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“It is a sad moment for the industry. I always remember a speech he made where he said, ‘On my business card, I am a corporate president. In my mind, I am a game developer. But in my heart, I am a gamer.’ It’s a statement that defines Nintendo in the time he led, and defines Iwata-san’s impact on our industry. He will be missed.”

– Phil Spencer, head of Microsoft’s Xbox division, in a statement

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“Our deepest condolences and sympathies go out to Mr. Iwata’s family and to everyone at Nintendo. Iwata-san was an innovator who led a transformation in the way people think about and play video games, and who helped make gaming more accessible and fun for countless new players. He will be missed.”

– Yves Guillemot, CEO and co-founder of Ubisoft, in a statement

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“It’s a very sad day. Mr. Iwata was a great visionary championing products like the Wii and the Nintendo DS. He changed entertainment forever. I consider myself lucky to have called him a good friend for over two decades. All of us at Activision Blizzard send his wife and children and the entire Nintendo family our most sincere condolences.”

– Bobby Kotick, CEO of Activision Blizzard, in a statement

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“I never met anyone in our industry who knew him who did not admire and respect Iwata. I believe our industry has suffered a great loss with his passing. The wisest among us will long try to remember and embody his character.”

– Randy Pitchford, president of Gearbox Software, in a statement

(Copyright 2015 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)

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