Gunman opens fire at Oregon college; at least 12 killed

umpqua shooting
Members of law enforcement have a meeting at the local fairgrounds after a deadly shooting at Umpqua Community College, in Roseburg, Ore., Thursday, Oct. 1, 2015. (AP Photo/Ryan Kang)

ROSEBURG, Ore. (AP) – A gunman opened fire at a rural Oregon community college Thursday, killing at least a dozen people before dying in a shootout with police, authorities said.

The killer, identified only as a 20-year-old man, invaded a classroom and demanded that people stand up and state their religion before spraying more bullets, one student reported.

Authorities shed no light on the gunman’s motive and said they were investigating.

Oregon Attorney General Ellen Rosenblum said 13 people were dead after the attack at Umpqua Community College in the small timber town of Roseburg, about 180 miles south of Portland. It was not immediately clear whether that number included the gunman. State police Lt. Bill Fugate told KATU-TV that at least 20 others were hurt.

“It’s been a terrible day,” a grim-faced Douglas County Sheriff John Hanlin said at a news conference. “Certainly this is a huge shock to our community.”

Hours after the attack, a visibly angry President Barack Obama spoke to reporters, saying the U.S. is becoming numb to mass shootings and that the shooters have “sickness” in their minds.

Repeating his support for tighter gun-control measures, the president said thoughts and prayers are no longer enough in such situations because they do nothing to stop similar attacks from happening a few weeks or months later. He challenged voters wanting to confront the problem to vote for elected officials who will act.

Police began receiving calls about a campus shooting at 10:38 a.m. The school has a single unarmed security guard.

Kortney Moore, 18, said she was in a freshman writing class when a shot came through the window and hit the teacher in the head.

The gunman then entered the Snyder Hall classroom and told people to get on the floor, she told the Roseburg News-Review newspaper. He told people to stand up and state their religion before opening fire.

Next door, students heard a loud thud and then a volley of gunfire, Brady Winder, 23, told the newspaper.

Students scrambled “like ants, people screaming, ‘Get out!'” Winder said. He said one woman swam across a creek to get away.

The sheriff said officers had a shootout with the gunman, but it was not clear if he was killed by authorities or whether he took his own life.

The gunfire sparked panic as students ran for safety and police and ambulances rushed to the scene.

Lorie Andrews, who lives across the street from the campus, heard what sounded like fireworks and then saw police cruisers streaming in. She spoke with students as they left.

“One girl came out wrapped in a blanket with blood on her,” she said.

Some students were in tears as they left. Police lined up students in a parking lot with their hands over their heads and searched them before they were bused with faculty to the nearby county fairgrounds, where counselors were available and some parents waited for their children.

Jessica Chandler of Myrtle Creek, south of Roseburg, was at the fairgrounds desperately seeking information about her 18-year-old daughter, Rebecka Carnes.

“I don’t know where she is. I don’t know if she’s wounded. I have no idea where she’s at,” Chandler said.

Carnes’ best friend told Chandler that her daughter had been flown by helicopter to a hospital, but she had not been able to find her at area medical centers.

Interim college President Rita Cavin said it was awful to watch families waiting for the last bus of survivors and their loved ones were not on it.

“This is a tragedy and an anomaly,” she said. “We have a wonderful, warm, loving and friendly campus.”

The sheriff described the town of 22,000 as a peaceful community that has crime like any other. In fact, it’s no stranger to school gun violence. A freshman at the local high school shot and wounded a fellow student in 2006.

The community along Interstate 5 west of the Cascade Mountains is in an area where the timber industry has struggled. In recent years, officials have tried to promote the region as a tourist destination for vineyards and outdoor activities.

Many of the students in local school district go on to attend the college of 3,000 students.

“We are a small, tight community, and there is no doubt that we will have staff and students that have family and friends impacted by this event,” Roseburg Public Schools Superintendent Gerry Washburn said.

Former UCC President Joe Olson, who retired in June after four years, said the school had no formal security staff, just one officer on a shift.

One of the biggest debates on campus last year was whether to post armed security officers on campus to respond to a shooting.

“I suspect this is going to start a discussion across the country about how community colleges prepare themselves for events like this,” he said.

There were no immediate plans to upgrade security on the campus in light of the shooting, Cavin said.

Associated Press writers Steven Dubois in Portland, Oregon; Martha Mendoza in Sana Cruz, California; and Gene Johnson and Donna Blankinship in Seattle contributed to this report. Brian Melley contributed writing from Los Angeles.

(Copyright 2015 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)

WKBN 27 First News provides commenting to allow for constructive discussion on the stories we cover. In order to comment here, you acknowledge you have read and agreed to our Terms of Service. Commenters who violate these terms, including use of vulgar language or racial slurs, will be banned. No links will be permitted. Please be respectful of the opinions of others. If you see an inappropriate comment, please flag it for our moderators to review.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s