Toledo officials seek federal help with Lake Erie algae

Environmentalists have been urging for the watershed to be designated as impaired

FILE- This Aug. 3, 2014 file photo shows Algae near the City of Toledo water intake crib, in Lake Erie, about 2.5 miles off the shore of Curtice, Ohio. Thick mats of algae spreading across western Lake Erie in recent weeks appear to be pushing one of the region’s most-prized sport fish to flee, forcing some charter boat captains to cancel trips. Scientists tracking the algae said Friday, Aug. 28, 2015 that the heaviest concentration is in the western third of the lake and that there aren’t any blooms in the central or eastern areas near Cleveland or Buffalo, N.Y. (AP Photo/Haraz N. Ghanbari, File)
FILE- This Aug. 3, 2014 file photo shows Algae near the City of Toledo water intake crib, in Lake Erie, about 2.5 miles off the shore of Curtice, Ohio. Thick mats of algae spreading across western Lake Erie in recent weeks appear to be pushing one of the region’s most-prized sport fish to flee, forcing some charter boat captains to cancel trips. Scientists tracking the algae said Friday, Aug. 28, 2015 that the heaviest concentration is in the western third of the lake and that there aren’t any blooms in the central or eastern areas near Cleveland or Buffalo, N.Y. (AP Photo/Haraz N. Ghanbari, File)

TOLEDO, Ohio (AP) – Officials in northwest Ohio are pushing to seek federal help in dealing with toxic algae in Lake Erie, a source of drinking water.

The Blade reports Toledo Mayor Paula Hicks-Hudson’s administration has asked City Council to consider a resolution urging Congress to strengthen the Clean Water Act.

If passed, the resolution would urge Congress to strengthen the law by creating direct regulatory controls over nonpoint sources of pollutants.

The move is short of what environmentalists have been urging Hicks-Hudson and council to ask the federal government: to designate the watershed as impaired.

City attorney Joe McNamara says the designation could have little effect on the algae blooms, but it would have a significant financial impact on the city. It would require costly waste water treatment plant additions and upgrades.

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